Author Archives: donnellyeve

Hunt recognized with young investigator award at ICCBMT meeting

PhD student Heather Hunt was awarded a young investigator award at the International Conference on the Chemistry and Biology of Mineralized Tissues in Potsdam, Germany to present her abstract entitled, “Collagen matrix alterations lead to bone embrittlement in type 2 diabetic men.”

Palomino and Taylor recognized by NSF GRFP

PhD student Pablo Palomino was awarded an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship, and PhD student Erik Taylor received Honorable Mention. Congratulations Pablo and Erik!

Hunt to present at 6th Advanced Study Institute on Global Healthcare Challenges

Heather Hunt will present an invited talk entitled, “Mechanical and Biochemical Assessment of Bone Quality in Type 2 Diabetics” at the NSF-sponsored 6th Advanced Study Institute on Global Healthcare Challenges held June 22-26 2015 in Izmir, Turkey.

Lab go-karting at Ringwood Raceway

Ryan Haris, Beth Weed, and Emma Luengo at the start

Ryan Haris, Beth Weed, and Emma Luengo at the start

IMG_0268

Beth chases Ryan late in the race

Donnelly presents at Nanobruecken 2015 at Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces

Prof. Donnelly presented a talk entitled, “Multiscale mechanical and compositional characterization of bone tissue in health and disease” at the Nanobruecken 2015 nanomechanics workshop at the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces in Potsdam, Germany.

Xu awarded ELI Undergraduate Research Award

Xiangyun (Joyce) Xu was awarded an Engineering Learning Initiatives Undergraduate Research Award for her proposal entitled, “Characterization of tissue composition in Type II diabetic human bone.” The ELI grant provides support for living and research expenses for her research in the lab this summer. Congratulations Joyce!

Donnelly receives NSF CAREER award

Eve Donnelly was awarded a grant through the NSF Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program entitled “CAREER: Role of Variations in Tissue Material Properties in Bone Fracture Behavior.” This work is expected to identify and predict how the changes in bone tissue composition that occur in osteoporosis will affect bone fracture behavior. More information is available via Cornell and NSF.

Lab sledding day in Cornell Plantations

Ryan Harris, Pablo Palomino, Ashley Lloyd, Heather Hunt, Eve Donnelly, Beth WEed

Ryan Harris, Pablo Palomino, Ashley Lloyd, Heather Hunt, Eve Donnelly, Beth Weed

Lloyd AA, Wang ZX, Donnelly E. Multiscale Contribution of Bone Tissue Material Property Heterogeneity to Trabecular Bone Mechanical Behavior. J Biomech Eng. 2015.

Abstract

Heterogeneity of material properties is an important potential contributor to bone fracture resistance because of its putative contribution to toughness, but establishing the contribution of heterogeneity to fracture risk is still in an incipient stage. Experimental studies have demonstrated changes in distributions of compositional and nanomechanical properties with fragility fracture history, disease, and pharmacologic treatment. Computational studies have demonstrated that models with heterogeneous material properties predict apparent stiffness moderately better than homogeneous models and show greater energy dissipation. Collectively, these results suggest that microscale material heterogeneity affects not only microscale mechanics but also structural performance at larger length scales.

PMID:25383615

Diaz awarded ELI Undergraduate Research Award

David Diaz was awarded an Engineering Learning Initiatives Undergraduate Research Award for his proposal entitled, “Assessment of bone tissue composition in a mouse model of Type II diabetes.” The ELI grant provides support for research expenses for his research in the lab this fall. Congratulations David!